Tag: Stephen Sondheim

Thoughts on Assassins: Human Qualities in These Stories of Unfulfilled Hopes

I have loved the score of Stephen Sondheim’s Assassins since I first heard the off-Broadway soundtrack in the early 1990s. The stylistically varied music reflected the historic scope of the tales being told and offered a unification of storytelling the likes of which I had never heard.  I was a bit nervous to see my

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Thoughts on Assassins: Gun Violence, the American Dream, and The Cult of Celebrity

My feelings about Assassins, the co-production between The 5th Avenue Theater and ACT, are difficult to unpack, but I will attempt to share some of my thoughts. I saw the show right after a Moms Demand Action for Gun Sense meeting where I learned some staggering statistics about American children growing up in homes with

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Stephen Sondheim: The Master of the Musical

Stephen Sondheim is our greatest musical theater dramatist. From his first produced work, West Side Story, to his most recent, Road Show, he has brought a playwright’s careful plotting and an actor’s toolbox of subtext, timing, and stagecraft to the writing of music and lyrics. His songs are complete dramatic texts, conceived as written “performances,” with

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Rodgers & Hammerstein: The Sound of Music

RICHARD RODGERS composed his first songs at a summer camp, then wrote music for shows at Columbia University. A friend introduced him to a smart young lyric writer, Larry Hart, who shared his ambitious artistic goals. The two wrote several clever scores, but they attracted little attention and Rodgers seriously considered an offer to quit

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